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1 - 12 of 26 for "salesbury"

1 - 12 of 26 for "salesbury"

  • DAVIES, RICHARD (1501? - 1581), bishop and biblical translator poets, and wrote some mediocre verses himself. To expedite the translation of the Bible into Welsh after the Act of 1563 he invited William Salesbury to Abergwili. The outcome of their collaboration was the Prayer Book and New Testament of 1567. The authorship of the former has been usually attributed to Davies, but its style is much more characteristic of Salesbury. Davies wrote the prefatory Epistol
  • DWNN, GRUFFYDD (c. 1500 - c. 1570), country gentleman obviously a patron of the bards, but it should be noted that William Salesbury also stayed at Ystrad Merthyr when he was at Abergwili.
  • ELLIS family Bron y Foel, Ystumllyn, Ynyscynhaearn by ELLIS AP CADWALADR, of Ystumllyn (died 1597). By his wife, Elin, daughter of Owen Wynn and Elin (Salesbury), Cae'r Melwr, near Llanrwst, Ellis ap Cadwaladr was the father of OWEN ELLIS I (died 1622 — see the elegy composed by Gruffydd Phylip), through whom the line was continued, and, among other children, Griffith Ellis. GRIFFITH ELLIS (died 1667), whose wife was Margaret (died 1667), daughter
  • EVANS, MEREDYDD (1919 - 2015), campaigner, musician, philosopher and television producer Radio Cymru. He was prepared to face imprisonment in his old age, but the fine was paid on his behalf by friends who were concerned about his health. From 1998 he was central to the campaign to establish the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol, until the battle was won in 2011. He subsequently committed himself to supporting the College by establishing the William Salesbury Trust and the Friends of the College
  • FISHER, JOHN (1862 - 1930), Welsh scholar Kynniver Llith a Ban (by William Salesbury), 1931. Among his contributions to Archaeologia Cambrensis were the following articles: ‘The Religious and Social Life of former days in the Vale of Clwyd,’ 1906; ‘Some Place-names in the locality of St. Asaph,’ 1914; ‘Wales in the time of Queen Elizabeth’; ‘The Wonders of Wales,’ 1915; ‘The Welsh Wills,’ 1919; ‘The Welsh Celtic Bells’; ‘Bardsey Island and its
  • GRUFFUDD HIRAETHOG (d. 1564), bard and herald of the bards to illustrate the meanings (Pen. MS. 230). A collection of proverbs made by him appears in Llanst. MS. 52. In his preface to this collection he writes appreciatively of the Welsh language and severely criticizes those who neglected it and refused to patronize it. His zeal in this respect is exactly that of the humanists. The collection of proverbs was copied by William Salesbury and
  • GRUFFYDD ap IEUAN ap LLYWELYN FYCHAN (c. 1485 - 1553), bard and member of a Welsh landed family of Gruffudd ap Ieuan (it is William Salesbury who identifies the ‘hen ewythr’ as Gruffudd ap Ieuan) a manuscript translation in Welsh of the Pentateuch; for details see the book by D. R. Thomas which is generally referred to under the short title of Davies and Salesbury. The manuscript which D. R. Thomas prints in this work, is, however, not the ‘lost’ translation of the Pentateuch but the Welsh
  • HENRY, PHILIP (1631 - 1696), Presbyterian minister and diarist , 1828-35. Of less ambitious works of his, several were translated into Welsh, some by James Davies (Iaco ap Dewi, 1648 - 1722). A rich collection of the various editions of Henry's works is lodged in the Salesbury library at Cardiff University College. He had been a student at Nonconformist Academies, and had entered Gray's Inn in 1685. It was at Chester, and in the Presbytery of that county, that he
  • JENKINS, JOHN (GWILI) (1872 - 1936), poet, theologian, and man of letters his school, and in 1917 he moved to Cardiff, at first as assistant to Thomas Powel, professor of Welsh at University College, then as acting-professor sede vacante, and finally in charge of the Salesbury Library (1919); it was at Cardiff (1920) that he published his volume of English poems. His wanderings ceased when in 1923 he was appointed professor of New Testament Exegesis at the Baptist College
  • LLWYD, HUW (Huw Llwyd o Gynfal; 1568? - 1630?), soldier and bard attributed to Edmund Prys). In one cywydd he asks Thomas Prys, of Plas Iolyn, Denbighshire, for a couple of hounds; see also a cywydd by Hugh Salesbury who asks Edward Lloyd, S. Asaph, to let Huw Llwyd have a greyhound cub this was on 6 October 1606. A medical treatise in the hand of Ellis Wynne (‘Y Bardd Cwsc’) in Pen. MS. 123 is taken from a MS. belonging to Huw Llwyd, who appears to have had some skill
  • LLWYD, HUMPHREY (c. 1527 - 1568), antiquary and map-maker he is said to have helped steer through the Bill to allow the translation of the Bible and Book of Common Prayer into Welsh. Though there are no Parliamentary records to confirm this, it is attested to in the eulogy written by Gruffudd Hiraethog. The subsequent Act resulted in the translation of the New Testament into Welsh by William Salesbury in 1567. Salesbury was a fellow Denbighshire man and
  • MIDLETON, WILLIAM (c. 1550 - c. 1600), poet, soldier, and sailor be found in manuscripts and, in 1603, Thomas Salesbury, London, published his Welsh translation of the Psalms, a translation written in the measures of the penceirddiaid. A fragment of another book by him, printed in 1595, was discovered a few years ago; this contains some of the Psalms together with some cywyddau. He was one of the earliest Welsh poets to look upon the printing press as a medium