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325 - 334 of 334 for "composed"

325 - 334 of 334 for "composed"

  • WILLIAMS, ROBERT HERBERT (Corfanydd; 1805 - 1876), musician Born in the parish of Bangor, Caernarfonshire. The parents moved to Liverpool when the son was quite young. Brought up as a clothier, he established a business in Basnett Street, Williamson Square. When he was only 17 he composed a hymn-tune ‘Deisyfiad,’ known later as ‘Dymuniad.’ This appeared first in Y Drysorfa, January 1835; it was published later in Casgliad o Donau (J. Ambrose Lloyd), 1843
  • WILLIAMS, THOMAS OSWALD (ap Gwarnant; 1888 - 1965), Unitarian minister, author, poet and public figure was acknowledged as a scholar and the beauty of his language and his ease of expression were proverbial. However, he did not escape criticism as one of the editors of the revised volume of the Unitarian hymnal Perlau Moliant which appeared in 1929 (see Ymofynnydd 1928, 195). Although he was not a musician, the ‘music of heaven’ was in his soul and he composed many hymns. His style as a hymn writer
  • WILLIAMS, WALDO GORONWY (1904 - 1971), poet and pacifist commitments. Most of the poems composed in the years up to 1939 did not appear at the time; many of these were in a light hearted vein. He published a series of poems in Y Ford Gron during the early 1930s; these included the lyric ‘Cofio’ (Remembrance) which was then included by T. H. Parry-Williams in Elfennau Barddoniaeth (The Elements of Poetry, part manual, part anthology) in 1935. This proved to be one
  • WILLIAMS, WILLIAM GILBERT (1874 - 1966), schoolmaster and local historian Historical Society. He composed two historical plays in cynghanedd, countless cywyddau and englynion. Among his numerous booklets are Cerddi gogan — beirdd newydd (1904-06), Hanes pentref Rhostryfan (1926), Breision hanes o 1688 hyd 1720, (1928), Olion hynafol (1944) and a volume of school songs. He printed and bound some of his booklets himself. Many articles written by him appeared in local periodicals
  • WILLIAMS, WILLIAM MATTHEWS (1885 - 1972), musician funeral of David Lloyd George. His hymn-tune ‘Llanystumdwy’ was composed in memory of Lloyd George. In 1946 he left Anglesey for Colwyn Bay, where he again conducted the local choral society from 1959 to 1968. He was an active supporter of the National Eisteddfod, of which he was invested a Fellow in 1969, and a popular adjudicator at competitions and festivals of all kinds. The University of Wales
  • WILLIAMS, WILLIAM NANTLAIS (1874 - 1959), minister (Presb.), editor, poet and hymn writer editors of Y Lladmerydd (1922-26), and editor of Yr Efengylydd (1916-33), and Trysorfa'r Plant (1934-47). He composed many hymns for children, indeed there was scarcely anyone more successful than he as a hymn writer for children. These hymns were published in three collections, Moliant Plentyn, part I (1920) and part II (1927), and Clychau'r Gorlan (1942). Many of his fine, inspired hymns are to be
  • WILLIAMS, WILLIAM SIDNEY GWYNN (1896 - 1978), musician and administrator National Eisteddfod. In 1947, following a suggestion made by the journalist Harold Tudor, he was one of the founders of the Llangollen International Eisteddfod, and retained a close association with that Eisteddfod until his death. He composed several songs which became popular, among them ‘God knows’, ‘God's mercy’, and ‘My little Welsh home’, and he edited volumes of traditional songs: Old Welsh Folk
  • WYNN, WILLIAM (1709 - 1760), cleric, antiquary, and poet , corresponding with his friends within the Morrisian circle, mainly on these topics, in the light of manuscripts which he had collected and copied. He composed a few cywyddau, ballads, carols, and englynion on the usual subjects of his circle and his period. And though he had not the greatness of Goronwy Owen or Lewis Morris, by his learning and by collecting manuscripts, by his letters and his poetry, with
  • WYNNE, DAVID (1900 - 1983), composer compositions during week-ends and school holidays, and began a new phase in his life when in 1945 he won the A. J. Clements Composition Prize for his String Quartet no. 1. One of the adjudicators of the competition was the English composer Michael Tippett, who became a close friend and advocate for his work. Wynne composed four symphonies and a number of large-scale chamber works, including five string
  • WYNNE, ROBERT (d. 1720), cleric and poet Gwyddelwern, 6 November 1745, and administration of his estate was granted to his principal creditor, John Lloyd of Dolyglesyn, Corwen. The englynion composed by and to him at the Bala Eisteddfod of 1738 show that he had also inherited his father's gift for poetry and friendship with poets. Alumni Oxon under Robert Wynne needs correction. Three persons of the name held cures in the diocese of S. Asaph at