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13 - 24 of 334 for "composed"

13 - 24 of 334 for "composed"

  • CADWALADR, DAFYDD (1752 - 1834), Calvinistic Methodist preacher ; his daughter tells us that he composed his sermons while knitting ‘very fast’; and as he was an untiring walker (even to London) he became a favourite preacher throughout Wales. He was a great friend of Thomas Charles, and published elegies on the death of Mr. and Mrs. Charles (Ehediadau y Meddwl, Bala, 1816). He died 9 July 1834; he was buried at Llanycil. Practically everything written on Dafydd
  • CATRIN ferch GRUFFYDD ap IEUAN [ap LLYWELYN?] FYCHAN (fl. 16th century), poet Daughter, it appears, of the poet Gruffydd ap Ieuan ap Llywelyn Fychan of Llannerch in the Vale of Clwyd. One poem only of her work remains, a religious poem in N.L.W. MS. 722 (155). It appears that the poem in Cardiff MS. 19 (742), Cwrtmawr MS. 14 (72), and N.L.W. MS. 6681 (404) was composed by her sister, Alice.
  • CLOUGH, Sir RICHARD (d. 1570), merchant, and (for a period) ‘factor’ for Sir Thomas Gresham in Antwerp 40 years of age when he died. Welsh elegies were composed upon his death by Siôn Tudur, Simwnt Vychan, and William Cynwal; there are two such elegies by Cynwal in N.L.W. MS. 6496 (facsimile of a Christ Church, Oxford, manuscript). Cynwal has two other interesting poems in the same manuscript written to Clough and Katherine — one a ‘kowydd’ to send a hawk to greet ‘ric. Klwch a meistres Katrin’ when
  • CRADOCK, Sir MATHEW (1468? - 1531), royal official in South Wales in the lordships of Cardif, Glomorgan, Morgannok, Gower, Ilande, Vske, and Carlyon (Cal. Pat. Rolls, 6 H. VII). Again, Matthew Craddoke of London, alias of Swaynesey, co. Glamorgan, is granted a pardon for not appearing before the king's justices 6 February 1504-5 (Cal. Pat. Rolls, 20 H. VII). The contemporary Welsh bard Iorwerth Fynglwyd composed two poems referring to Sir Mathew, one when he was
  • CYNDDELW BRYDYDD MAWR (fl. 1155-1200), leading 12th century Welsh court poet He was recognized by poets of the two succeeding centuries (Myv. Arch., 111a, 164a, and 204b) as a leading master of eulogy to princes. He composed in awdl and englyn metres. The grammarians refer to the clogyrnach metre as the ‘manner of Cynddelw,’ and as far as we know he was the first to make extensive use of the englyn unodl union. Two traditions are seen to merge in his work — that of the
  • CYNGAR (fl. 6th century), saint Two ‘Vitae S. Cungari’ are known to modern biographers. The oldest, recently discovered in fragmentary form at Wells, Somerset, was composed probably in the 12th century; the second is a fuller but later version added to the 1516 printed edition of John of Teignmouth's ‘Vitae SS.’ They relate that, after founding Congresbury in Som., S. Cungar crossed to Glamorgan and landed on the banks of the
  • CYNWAL, RICHARD (d. 1634), poet of Maes y Garnedd (?), Capel Garmon, Denbighshire His work, written in the strict metres, consists chiefly of poems to various North Walian gentry. He took pride especially in his position as family poet at Rhiwedog mansion (near Bala), and a bardic controversy ensued between Richard Phylip and himself because of this. He composed an eulogy to Tomas Prys of Plas Iolyn and an elegy to Siôn Phylip
  • DAFYDD ap DAFYDD LLWYD (1549), poet and member of the landed family ] Caereinion (1599), Siôn Huws of Maes y Pandy, near Tal-y-llyn, and Doctor [ David ] Powel, bardic controversies (ymrysonau) between himself and Roger Cyffin, and, also, with Lewys Dwnn, and religious and moral poems. Bedo Hafesp composed an elegy on him (Bodewryd MS. 1 (289)). N.L.W. MS. 5270 (327) contains an englyn presumably by his son John.
  • DAFYDD AP GWILYM (c. 1315 - c. 1350), poet used to travel the length and breadth of the country. His love poetry would certainly have been in demand, and it is perfectly possible that he earned his living as a professional poet like many of his contemporaries. His most important patrons in Ceredigion were the family of Glyn Aeron, a court which was a focus for innovative literary activity in this period. Dafydd composed an elegy to Angharad
  • DAFYDD ap SIANCYN (SIENCYN) ap DAFYDD ap y CRACH (fl. mid 15th century), Lancastrian partisan and poet Gwydir Family : from his eyrie on Carreg-y-gwalch (near Llanrwst) he kept the Yorkists out of the commote of Nanconwy till 1468, and raided the surrounding country. Ieuan ap Gruffydd Leiaf and Tudur Penllyn sang his praises. Though Tudur, in his cywydd to him, extols his poetic skill, only three englynion of Dafydd's are extant. One of these is addressed to Tudur Penllyn. The other two, composed on his
  • DAFYDD EMLYN (fl. 1603-1622), poet and cleric according to Moses Williams. The epithet ‘Emlyn’ suggests that he was a native of the Teify valley. His poems, written in the strict metres, were composed in honour of families living in the Cemais (Pembrokeshire) area, such as those of Henllys (1603), Llwyn-gwair, Tre Wern (1614), and Pen-y-benglog (1618, 1622), in Trimsaran, and in Margam. Some of his poems written in his own hand may be seen
  • DAFYDD LLWYD (d. 1619) HENBLAS,, poet and scholar according to Dwnn). Noted for his scholarship, he is said to have known eight languages. A number of his poems, all in strict metre, have been preserved in manuscript. They include an elegy to his wife, Catherine, and three englynion to one of his sons. ‘Sir’ Huw Roberts and Richard Cynwal composed elegies upon his death.