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1 - 12 of 334 for "composed"

1 - 12 of 334 for "composed"

  • ADAM OF USK (Adam Usk; 1352? - 1430), lawyer obscurity. He died early in 1430 and was buried in the priory church of Usk, where his epitaph, composed in the Welsh cywydd metre, is still to be seen. His will has also been preserved, in which he makes many bequests to religious causes in the diocese of Llandaff and to persons bearing Welsh names. Among his legacies was one to his executor and relative, Edward ab Adam. This was his copy of Higden's
  • ASHTON, JOHN (1830 - 1896), musician Born in a house called Oleuddu, near Trefeglwys, Montgomeryshire. He was a shoemaker by trade, but meeting with an accident which prevented him from following that occupation, he joined the police force. Hymn tunes composed by him — they include ‘Trefeglwys,’ composed in 1857 -are found in Llyfr Tonau Cynulleidfaol, Caniadau y Cysegr a'r Teulu, and Cerddor yr Ysgol Sabothol, and there are songs
  • BADDY, THOMAS (d. 1729), Independent minister and author 1729, also ministering to the congregations of Wrexham and of Bala during pastoral vacancies at either place. He married Anne, daughter of Robert Salusbury of Galltfaenan (Palmer, ibid.); their daughter married a prosperous Denbigh tradesman called Pugh, on whose land Swan Lane chapel was built in 1742. Baddy's congregation of sixty was (according to John Evans's statistics of 1715) composed of
  • BAYLY, LEWIS (d. 1631), bishop and devotional writer capitulation to Fairfax. Bayly himself came off lightly, crossed to the Continent, but returned soon after the king's execution; before the end of 1649 he had published The Royal Charter Granted unto Kings, which brought him into Newgate prison; in that prison he composed Herba Parietis, a book of contemplations, published in 1650. He managed to escape from Newgate, crossed to Holland, and declared himself a
  • BENNETT, NICHOLAS (1823 - 1899), musician and historian Born 8 May 1823 at Glanrafon, Trefeglwys, Montgomeryshire, (christened 8 June 1823). He took a deep interest in collecting and studying historical, poetical, and musical works; composed two songs — one for Y Cerddor and the other for Songs of the Four Nations. He collected over 700 Welsh airs, of which 500 were published in two volumes in 1896 under the title Alawon fy Ngwlad, the selection and
  • BLAKE, LOIS (1890 - 1974), historian and promoter of Welsh folk dancing death in 1974, serving the Society with unwavering dedication. She was also a talented artist and painter, and illustrated several of the early publications of the Welsh Folk Dance Society, as well designing greetings cards. She continued during this period to research and discover dances, and also composed dances herself - many of them popular and in the repertoire of dance teams in Wales and beyond
  • BLEDDYN FARDD (fl. 1268-1283), one of the bards of the independent Welsh princes death of Goronwy ab Ednyfed (died 1268), and the latest is his ode to the three sons of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, after the execution of prince David in 1283. The Bleddyn Fardd whose elegy was composed by Cynddelw Brydydd Mawr was a different person.
  • BOSSE-GRIFFITHS, KATE (1910 - 1998), Egyptologist and author unfamiliarly open approach to their discussions and who was already mastering the Welsh language. Her continental, modernist background and her classical education, informed by the discussions and pacifist principles of the Cadogan Circle, soon expressed themselves in the poems, novels and short stories she composed in Welsh. She published a series of innovative poems and stories in the journal Heddiw in
  • BRADNEY, Sir JOSEPH ALFRED (Achydd Glan Troddi; 1859 - 1933), historian Grammar School in the Parish of Llantilio-Crossenny, 1924; (h) A Survey of the general history of the town of Newport and district, 1925; (i) A Memorandum, being an attempt to give a chronology of the decay of the Welsh language in the eastern part of the County of Monmouth, 1926. He also published Noctes Flandricae (London), a collection of poems and prose composed mainly in Flanders in 1917. He
  • BRIOC (fl. 6th century), saint A ‘Life,’ composed probably in the 11th century and of not inconsiderable literary merit, is the oldest authority for the legend of S. Brioc. It relates that the original form of the saint's name was Briomaglus, and that he was a native of Corotica — the Welsh Ceredigion. His father, Cerp, and his mother, Eldruda, both abandoned their heathen beliefs and embraced Christianity as the result of an
  • BRYANT, TOM (1882 - 1946), harpist Bryans's accompaniment on the harp, he travelled extensively in south Wales. He became an A.R.C.M. in 1906, and in the same year received King Edward VII's command to play the harp at the opening of a new dock in Cardiff. With the ‘Golden Quartette’ he held concerts at the principal towns of Britain. He wrote music for the harp, and composed variations on the tunes ‘Merch y Felin’ and ‘Merch Megan’. He
  • BRYNACH (fl. late 5th century — early 6th century), saint The chief source for the Brynach legend is a ‘life’ composed probably in the 12th century and now preserved in B.M. Cotton Vesp. MS. A. xiv. The wealth of local details makes it almost certain that the author was a native of Cemais in north Pembrokeshire. The ‘life’ reveals nothing of the saint's antecedents, but Welsh tradition remembers him as Brynach Wyddel (the Irishman). After a pilgrimage