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13 - 24 of 702 for "Catherine Roberts"

13 - 24 of 702 for "Catherine Roberts"

  • BREESE, JOHN (1789 - 1842), Independent minister Born at Llanbrynmair, September 1789. In his younger days he was almost entirely dependent on the Sunday school for his education. At the age of 20 he was admitted a full member of the church in the Old Chapel, then under the ministry of John Roberts (1767 - 1834), and when he was 24 he was invited to start preaching. His friends helped him to go to a school in Shrewsbury, after which he was
  • BRERETON, OWEN SALUSBURY (1715 - 1798), antiquary Son of Thomas Brereton of Flintshire; his mother was Catherine, daughter of Salusbury Lloyd. His career and work are fully described in the D.N.B.
  • BRUNT, Sir DAVID (1886 - 1965), meteorologist and vice-president of the Royal Society Birmingham and two years in a similar post at the Monmouthshire Training College, Caerleon. While he was at Caerleon, he married in 1915 Claudia Mary Elizabeth Roberts of Nant-y-glo, Monmouth, who had been a fellow student both at Abertillery and Aberystwyth. They had one son who died unmarried. The real turning point in David Brunt's career came in 1916 when he enlisted in the Royal Engineers
  • BULKELEY, WILLIAM (1691 - 1760), squire and diarist Catherine £550 within a year. Some have said that he had Methodist leanings, and that he wrote a pamphlet to support their tenets. Bulkeley was assuredly no Methodist, and that pamphlet has not yet been discovered. It is true he gave harbourage in 1749 to William Prichard, one of the sturdy pioneers of Nonconformity in the island of Anglesey; but there is no proof that he sympathized in the slightest with
  • CADWALADR, DAFYDD (1752 - 1834), Calvinistic Methodist preacher Second son of Cadwaladr and Catherine Dafydd, of Erw Ddinmael, Llangwm, Denbighshire; the family had lived on the holding for generations, and was typical of the region, delighting in 'interludes' and knitting-meetings. Dafydd was himself a versifier in his youth, but had to teach himself reading by noting the letters on sheeps' backs and then picking his way through the Prayer Book; he became a
  • CARNE, Sir EDWARD (c. 1500 - 1561), lawyer and diplomat The son of Howel Carne of Nash and a descendant of the princes of Gwent. Educated at Oxford (where he graduated B.C.L. 1519, D.C.L. 1524), he became principal of Greek Hall in 1521. In 1530 he was attached in a legal capacity to the embassy of the earl of Wiltshire (Anne Boleyn's father) to explain to Charles V at Bologna the king's reasons for repudiating Catherine of Aragon; thence he
  • CARRINGTON, THOMAS (Pencerdd Gwynfryn; 1881 - 1961), musician and printer Born at Gwynfryn, Bwlch-gwyn, near Wrexham, Denbighshire, 24 November 1881, the son of John Carrington (a descendant of one of the families that migrated from Cornwall to work in the Denbighshire lead mines) and Winifred (née Roberts), a native of Bryneglwys. He spent his early years at Gwynfryn and was educated at Bwlch-gwyn school. After leaving school he was apprenticed as a printer at Hughes
  • CARTER family Kinmel, Kinmel, near Abergele, once the property of a Lloyd family (Yorke, Royal Tribes, 2nd edn., 113), changed hands when Alice, heiress of Gruffudd Lloyd, married Richard ap Dafydd ab Ithel Fychan, of Plas Llaneurgain (Northop). Their daughter and heiress, Catherine, married Pyrs Holland (died 1552), of Faerdref (see Holland families, No. 5); thus was founded the house of Holland of Kinmel (ibid., No
  • CATHERALL, JONATHAN (1761 - 1833), industrialist and philanthropist married Catherine Jones, daughter of the vicar of Llannor and Denïo, Caernarfonshire. Accustomed to attend Hawarden church, about the year 1785 he joined the Independents and was closely associated with their cause throughout his life. He was deeply concerned for the moral and spiritual welfare of the increasing population of his native district, and took a prominent part in establishing the Independent
  • CECIL-WILLIAMS, Sir JOHN LIAS CECIL (1892 - 1964), solicitor, secretary Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion and driving force behind the publishing of the Dictionary of Welsh Biography Born 14 October 1892 in Paddington, London, one of two children of John Cadwaladr Williams, a doctor, and Catherine (née Thomas) his wife. (The son adopted the hyphenated name of Cecil-Williams by deed-poll in 1935). The family came from Uwch Aled. He was educated first in London and, for a year or so, in the village school at Cerrigydrudion. Returning to London he attended the City of London
  • CHARLES, DAVID (1812 - 1878), Calvinistic Methodist minister Aberystwyth in October 1872. Upon the appointment of his nephew T. C. Edwards as principal he resigned his post and later migrated to Aberdovey, where he died on 13 December 1878. In 1869 he was moderator of the general assembly of his connexion. He married (1), 1839, Kate Roberts, Holyhead, who died c. 1844; (2), 1846, Mary, daughter of Hugh Jones of Llanidloes and widow of Benjamin Watkins, by whom he had
  • CHARLES, DAVID (1803 - 1880), Calvinistic Methodist minister and hymnist of Thomas Rice Charles - she died 1833; (2) Ann, daughter of Richard Roberts, Liverpool. He died at his son's house, 10 May 1880, and is buried at Ulverston, Lancashire.