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1 - 12 of 1116 for "henry morgan"

1 - 12 of 1116 for "henry morgan"

  • ADAM OF USK (Adam Usk; 1352? - 1430), lawyer conceal his hostility to Richard II and his supporters. When the tables were turned in 1399, he was on the winning side; he accompanied Henry IV and the archbishop from Bristol to Chester, and on the way made up a quarrel between Lancaster and his own friends in Usk. He was a member of the commission appointed to find legal grounds for the deposition of Richard, and saw and heard him during his
  • ALMER family Almer, Pant Iocyn, This family was descended in an unbroken line from the 11th century reconqueror of Denbighshire east of the Dyke, Ithel ab Eunydd. The surname was first adopted by JOHN ALMER, who held minor office at the court of Henry VIII and obtained for his sons John and William posts as sergeants-at-arms. Between 1554 and 1558 Almer was demolished, and its stones used to build Pant Iocyn, a short distance
  • ANGHARAD, ferch MORGAN ap MEREDUDD (1293 or 1299) - see IFOR HAEL
  • ANIAN (d. 1293), bishop of S. Asaph in the same year at Berriw, and also to the compact between Llywelyn and Rhodri executed at Caernarvon on 12 April 1272. On 30 October 1272 he appears as the prince's envoy to Henry III, then nearing his end, and is praised by the king as having well performed his task. But Llywelyn's veiled hostility to the new sovereign brought about a change in Anian also. At the end of 1273 he wrote to Gregory
  • ANTHONY, HENRY MARK (1817 - 1886), landscape painter
  • ANTHONY, WILLIAM TREVOR (1912 - 1984), singer adjudicators, the singer Henry Plunket Greene, to pursue a professional career. His tutor Gwilym R. Jones organised a local appeal fund to support a course of study in London, and Anthony studied at the Royal Academy of Music from 1935 to 1939, under the tutelage of Norman Allin. He held the George Mence Smith scholarship, and at the end of his course won the Robert Radford Memorial Prize and the Rutson
  • AP GWYNN, ARTHUR (1902 - 1987), librarian and the third librarian of the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth 1967, a period of over 31 years. 'A story of small beginnings and a slow growth and a somewhat uncertain future.' That is how Arthur ap Gwynn himself described his period as librarian of the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, between 1932 and 1967. His predecessor, J. D. Williams concluded his account of the College Library in The College by the Sea (edited by Iwan Morgan, 1928) with
  • ARNOLD family Llanthony, Llanvihangel Crucorney, The founder of the fortunes of this old Monmouthshire family, descended from Gwilym ap Meurig but adopting the surname Arnold at an early stage, was Sir NICHOLAS ARNOLD (1507? - 1580), a gentleman pensioner of Henry VIII who, in consequence of his work for Thomas Cromwell at the Dissolution (18 June 1546) acquired Llanthony abbey (living, however, on his Gloucestershire estates), became a rabid
  • ASHTON, CHARLES (1848 - 1899), Welsh bibliographer and literary historian essay on ' Y Beirdd Cymreig o William Llŷn hyd at Gwilym Hiraethog '; Caernarvon (1894), Gwaith Iolo Goch (published by the National Eisteddfod Association, 1896). Ashton also published Traethawd or Ffeiriau Cymru (Llanelli, 1881), Bywyd ac Amserau'r Esgob Morgan (Treherbert, 1891), A Guide to Dinas Mawddwy (Aberystwyth, 1893), and a Welsh translation, entitled Y Ddirprwyaeth Dirol Gymreig. Crynhodeb
  • ATKIN, LEON (1902 - 1976), minister of the Social Gospel and a campaigner for the underclass in south Wales was to criticise the Labour Party (a political party he had joined when he was 16) and the churches in Wales for being so ineffective. The leaders within the Synod were disturbed with him and arranged for him to be moved to Cornwall. Atkin refused to accept their verdict. The Reverend Edward Morgan, a Congregationalist minister in Cardiff, heard of Atkin's refusal, and suggested to a number of
  • AUBREY, WILLIAM (c. 1529 - 1595), civil lawyer in the suppression of Welsh piracy and was privately retained as counsel (much to their advantage) by the Merchant Adventurers. Questions of jurisdiction in Wales, Ireland, and the Channel Islands were among those he resolved in the sphere of constitutional law, and he was brought into even more direct contact with politics when his kinsman and benefactor Henry Herbert, 2nd earl of Pembroke
  • BAILEY family Glanusk Park, Brecknock succeeded by his son, JOSEPH HENRY RUSSELL BAILEY (1864 - 1928), 2nd baron Glanusk, 3rd baronet, a major in the Grenadier Guards, and afterwards Lieutenant-Colonel 3rd Battalion South Wales Borderers; like his father, he was lord-lieutenant of Brecknock.