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1 - 12 of 1799 for "David Lloyd George"

1 - 12 of 1799 for "David Lloyd George"

  • ABEL, JOHN (1770 - 1819), Welsh Independent minister Born in Llanybri, Carms., 1770, s. of William Abel, one of the founders of Capel Newydd in that village. It is said that he attended the Carmarthen Academy but this establishment was in Swansea at that time. In 1794 he succeeded David Davies (died 1807 as minister of the small congregation at Capel Sul, Kidwelly and he also kept a school. John Abel was not orthodox, according to the Unitarian
  • ABEL, SIÔN (fl. 18th cent.), Montgomeryshire ballad-writer Author of ‘Cerdd yn erbyn medd-dod, celwydd a chybydd-dra’ (Song against drunkenness, lies and miserliness), which was published by H. Lloyd, of Shrewsbury, in a booklet of three ballads, recorded as No. 154 in J. H. Davies's Bibliography of Welsh Ballads. An English song of ten stanzas in the Welsh metre known as tri-thrawiad is to be found in N.L.W. MS. 14402, a manuscript book in the hand of
  • ABRAHAM, WILLIAM (Mabon; 1842 - 1922), M.P. and first president of the South Wales Miners’ Federation attracted enormous crowds. He would often sing to the audiences, as he was endowed with a good tenor voice. In 1860 he m. Sarah, daughter of David Williams; she d. in 1900, having borne him three sons and three daughters. Mabon was made a Privy Councillor in 1911. He d. at Pentre, Rhondda, 14 May 1922.
  • ADAM (d. 1181), bishop of S. Asaph Powys, and the death of bishop David of S. Davids in May 1176 seemed to provide an opportunity to recover it for the northern bishopric. He resolved to make a beginning with the border church of Kerry and engaged the assistance of the local authorities, both lay and clerical. But this was to ignore the recently appointed archdeacon of Brecknock, none other than the formidable Gerald. The two opponents
  • ADAMS, DAVID (1845 - 1923), Congregationalist divine Born 28 Aug. 1845 at Tal-y-bont, Cards., the son of John and Margaret Adams. His father, who was a bootmaker by trade, was prominent in all the cultural activities of the countryside and was also a lay preacher. David went to the grammar school at Llanfihangel, where he learned the elements of Latin and Greek, but when attendance at the Church of England was made a condition of attendance at the
  • ADAMS, WILLIAM (1813 - 1886), mining expert Born at Pen-y-cae, Ebbw Vale, 10 Oct. 1813, son of John and Mary Adams. The father was a working collier at the time but a man of remarkable skill in that vocation; later he became mineral agent for Charles Lloyd Harford & Co. William was educated at Cowbridge Grammar School. In May 1828 he was apprenticed to Charles Lloyd Harford and in the course of time he became expert in his own branch. He
  • AIDAN (fl. 6th cent.), saint Known also as Aidus, Maidoc, and Madoc. His ‘Life,’ as preserved in Cotton. Vesp. MS. A. xiv at the British Museum and as printed in Colgan's Acta Sanctorum, reveals Aidan as a saint connected chiefly with Ireland. His youth was, however, spent in south-west Wales, where he was a pupil of S. David, and where his name has been preserved in church appellations and place-names. Traditionally close
  • ALBAN DAVIES, DAVID (1873 - 1951), business man and philanthropist old. On 28 Nov. 1899 he m. Rachel Williams of Brynglas, Moria, Penuwch, in Holy Trinity Church, Aberystwyth; they had 4 sons and a daughter. Davies and his wife went to London to work with Rachel's brother Evan who had a successful dairy business. David Alban Davies eventually bought Hitchman's Dairies, Ltd., which grew into a flourishing business under his direction. In 1933 he built Brynawelon
  • ALBAN DAVIES, JENKIN (1901 - 1968), business man and philanthropist Born 24 June 1901, in Walthamstow, London, the eldest son of David Alban Davies and Rachel (née Williams) his wife, both of Cards. He was educated at Merchant Taylors' School, and gained a scholarship to St. John's College, Oxford, but could not afford to go there. He went to Cornell University, U.S.A., for two years to study agriculture and dairying and worked for a short while in American firms
  • ALBAN, Sir FREDERICK JOHN (1882 - 1965), chartered accountant and administrator Born 11 Jan. 1882, at ? Abergavenny, Mon., s. of David Alban and his wife Hannah. The mother d. at Abergavenny, 28 Sept. 1884. The father was a journeyman tailor and he d. at Hereford, 2 Jan. 1891. Consequently, the family was scattered. Two elder sons became shoemakers near Fleetwood. Frederick John was brought up by a Miss Williams at Lower Monk Street in Abergavenny until he was 16 years old
  • ALICE verch Griffith ap Ieuan ap Llywelyn Fychan (fl. 1540-1570), a poetess Daughter of the gentleman poet, Gruffydd ap Ieuan ap Llewelyn Fychan (c. 1485 - 1553) of Llannerch in Llewenni Fechan, Denbs. Her mother was his first wife, Jonet, daughter of Richard ap Howel of Mostyn (d. 1540). Alice (or Alice Wen) was b. about 1520, and m., about 1540, David Lloyd ap Rees of Vaynol, one of the Lloyds of Wigfair. Her children were John Lloyd (d. 1615), registrar of S. Asaph
  • ALLCHURCH, IVOR JOHN (1929 - 1997), footballer finals, before bowing out to eventual winners Brazil. He married Esme Thomas from Swansea on 13 June 1953. They had two sons, John Stephen Allchurch (b. 1954) and David Ivor Allchurch (b. 1961). Allchurch made a total of 782 Football League club appearances (including all cup competitions), scoring a remarkable 284 times. He played for his native Swansea Town from 1947 until 1958, making a total of 358