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1 - 12 of 250 for "iolo goch"

1 - 12 of 250 for "iolo goch"

  • IOLO GOCH (c. 1320 - c. 1398), poet a native of the Vale of Clwyd, son of Ithel Goch ap Cynwrig ap Iorwerth Ddu ap Cynwrig Ddewis Herod ap Cywryd. According to Hugh de Beckele's Extent of Denbigh (1334), Ithel Goch rented a small portion of the family's ancient patrimony in the township of Llewenni where he possessed a dwelling house. He also rented from the lord small parcels of land in Llechryd and Berain. Of the works attributed
  • ITHEL DDU (fl. second half of 14th century), poet He was most probably an Anglesey man - 'of the land of Meilyr,' says Iolo Goch, though Iolo also locates him in Llŷn, and indeed further transports him to Bardsey. Iolo styles him 'a famous poet,' but all that we have to substantiate that claim is a single cywydd, preserved in two copies, Peniarth MS 77 (441) and Peniarth MS 78 (135). It would indeed seem that Ithel was no professional bard, but
  • RHYS GOGH ap RHICCERT ., 1848, 228-51, which Edward Williams (Iolo Morganwg) claimed to have found in a manuscript book in the possession of John Bradford. Iolo also claimed that Rhys Goch had retained the use of the original Welsh metres, and as the Normans (acording to Iolo) had brought the influence of the troubadours to Wales, he held that a romantic school had arisen in Glamorgan early in the 12th century (see Llanover
  • LLYWELYN ap MOEL Y PANTRI (d. 1440) Llanwnnog, poet poems on the outlaws of Coed y Graig (and from suggestions in some of his other poems) it could be thought that the poet was himself one of the band. He turned to religion toward the end of his life, and was buried in the monastery of Strata Marcella. Guto'r Glyn and Rhys Goch Eryri wrote elegies on his death. Apparently some of his poems have been misattributed to Iolo Goch (see Iolo Goch ac Eraill
  • ITHEL ap RHOTPERT or ROBERT (fl. 1357-1382), archdeacon A friend and patron of Iolo Goch, who addressed two cywyddau of petition to him (printed in I.G.E., 1st ed. 55-61, 2nd ed. 49-55), and commemorated him in an elegy, printed in Ashton's edition of Iolo, 344-53. Ithel's family seat was Coed-y-mynydd in Ysgeifiog parish, Flintshire; he was well-born - Ashton (op. cit. 267, 325-6) prints, from Dwnn and Powys Fadog, relevant details of his pedigree
  • SYPYN CYFEILIOG (fl. 1340-1390), poet borne the name of Cneppyn Gwerthrynion, for he is mentioned by Gwilym Ddu o Arfon. Sir Ifor Williams suggests that three poets of short physical stature have been confused, namely Cneppyn Gwerthrynion, Bach Buddugre, and Sypyn Cyfeiliog. Sypyn sang a panegyric cywydd to Henry Salusbury of Lleweni (died 1400) and his wife Agnes Courtois, and also the two cywyddau included in Iolo Goch ac Eraill. This
  • GRUFFUDD LLWYD ap DAFYDD ab EINION LLYGLIW (fl. c. 1380-1410), a poet with Welsh literature and folklore, he was entertained at some of the famous courts of his period. His work includes poems to Owain Glyndŵr, Sir David Hanmer, Owain ap Maredudd of Neuadd Wen, and Hywel and Meurig Llwyd of Nannau, love and religious poetry, and it is now certain that he is the author of the poem to send the sun to greet Glamorgan, which has also been attributed to Iolo Goch and Dafydd
  • LLYWELYN GOCH ap MEURIG HEN (fl. c. 1360-1390), poet Lloyd) of Pennal, Merioneth, has become famous. A number of other cywyddau are also attributed to him. Some of his poetry is contained in The Myvyrian Archaiology of Wales Iolo Goch composed an elegy on his death.
  • MADOG BENFRAS (fl. c. 1320-1360), poet of Marchwiail, Denbighshire. His pedigree is given in Powys Fadog thus: ' Madog Benfras ap Gruffudd ap Iorwerth, arglwydd Sonlli, ab Einion Goch ab Ieuaf ap Llywarch ap Ieuaf ap Niniaw ap Cynfrig ap Rhiwallawn.' His two brothers, Llywelyn Llogell (parish priest of Marchwiail), and Ednyfed, were also poets; according to Iolo Morganwg their bardic teacher was Llywelyn ap Gwilym of Emlyn. Iolo also
  • MORTIMER, ROGER de (4th earl of March, 4th earl of Ulster), (1374 - 1398) bravery and generosity, while yet noticing his dissolute conduct. Richard II was childless, and intrigues for the succession were afoot among Edward III's other descendants. The king took an important step in 1385, when he acknowledged Roger de Mortimer as his heir, knighting him in 1390, and appointing him in 1397 deputy ruler of all Ireland. Probably this was the occasion which moved Iolo Goch, a man
  • HOPKIN, LEWIS (c. 1708 - 1771), poet Son of Lewis Hopkin of Llanbedr-ar-fynydd (Peterston-super-Montem), Glamorganshire, one of the descendants of Hopcyn Thomas Phylip, Gelli'r-fid, a writer of cwndidau. He learnt the craft of a carpenter; he became a master of other crafts also. When he was a young man he moved to the parish of Llandyfodwg and it was there, at Hendre Ifan Goch, that he made his home until he died in 1771. He became
  • SEISYLL BRYFFWRCH (1155 - 1175), poet identified with the ' Culfardd hardd hen ' mentioned by Iolo Goch (I.G.E., xvii, 36). Seisyll sang elegiac odes on the death of Owain Gwynedd, and of Iorwerth Drwyndwn, a son of that prince, and father of Llywelyn the Great. This second elegy is a main source of our scanty knowledge of Iorwerth (see Lloyd, A History of Wales, 549-50). This poet also sang the praises of the 'lord' Rhys in a poem where he