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DAFYDD AP MAREDUDD GLAIS (fl. 1427-1468), murderer, civic official, scribe and translator

Name: Dafydd Ap Maredudd Glais
Parent: Maredudd Glais
Gender: Male
Occupation: murderer, civic official, scribe and translator
Area of activity: Public and Social Service, Civil Administration; Literature and Writing; Scholarship and Languages; Religion; Anti-Establishment
Author: Katherine Himsworth

A member of one of Aberystwyth's leading 15th century families, Dafydd was the son of Maredudd Glais. He acted as attorney for his father in 1432-3 and was committed to Cardigan castle for arrears that had accumulated. Like his father, he appears to have been an archer and in 1438 was given a letter of protection to go abroad in Edmund Beaufort's retinue. In 1439 he stood pledge, with John Roubury and Gruffydd Prouth, for Thomas Kirkham, abbot of the monastery of Vale Royal in Cheshire, in respect of a fine.

By 1440-41 he had murdered Gruffydd Prouth and Gruffydd's son Dafydd Fychan. His father, Maredudd, Thomas Glais and John Roubury were all accused of being associated with him. Dafydd was pardoned in return for a £40 fine, but the murder led to a feud with the Prouth family, as a result of which Sir William ap Thomas and Gruffydd ap Nicolas were accepted by both sides as arbiters. On 12 September 1441 the parties concluded a tripartite agreement whereby Dafydd and his kinsmen agreed to pay 304s for the use of the dead men's relatives; Dafydd was also required not to come into the town of Aberystwyth or the town or church of Llanbadarn Fawr for a time. On 2 July 1445, the king ordered Gruffydd ap Nicolas and others to make inquisition in the county of Cardigan 'touching all treasons, felonies and trespasses done there by David ap Mereth Gleyse of Haberustoth'.

In 1444, he wrote Peniarth MS 22 . This contains a copy of a Welsh translation (the Dingestow version) of Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae and his own translation from Latin into Welsh of a short and incomplete chronicle of the kings of England. He demonstrates a competent scribal hand.

He subsequently became reeve of Aberystwyth in 1457-9, 1460-63 and 1467-8.

Author

Published date: 2019-08-29

Article Copyright: http://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/

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DAFYDD ap MAREDUDD GLAIS (fl. 1429-1468), cleric, murderer, civic official, and translator of a chronicle of the kings of England into Welsh

Name: Dafydd Ap Maredudd Glais
Parent: Maredudd Glais
Gender: Male
Occupation: cleric, murderer, civic official, and translator of a chronicle of the kings of England into Welsh
Area of activity: Literature and Writing; Public and Social Service, Civil Administration; Religion; Scholarship and Languages
Author: Evan David Jones

He was the son of Maredudd Glais, a man who filled a number of municipal offices in Aberystwyth and Llanbadarn between 1411 and 1458. The date of Dafydd's birth is not known and the earliest mention of him in the records is as a pledge with John Robury and Griffith Prouth for Thomas Kirkham, abbot of Vale Royal, in respect of a fine in 1429. The three are described as clerics, and they undoubtedly belonged to the church of Llanbadarn, which had been appropriated to Vale Royal since 1360. In 1442, he was convicted of the murder of Griffith Prouth, but, being in holy orders, he was not condemned to death. The names of the pledges for his fine are preserved in the ministers’ accounts for Cardiganshire.

In 1444, he wrote Peniarth MS 22, which contains a copy of the Welsh version of Geoffrey of Monmouth's ‘Historia Regum Britanniae,’ and his own translation of the chronicle of the kings of England from Latin into Welsh.

Deprived of his orders, he followed his family's municipal tradition, and his name appears as provost of Aberystwyth in 1459-62 and in 1467-8.

Author

  • Evan David Jones, (1903 - 1987), Aberystwyth

    Sources

  • 'Public Record Office—Ministers' Accounts.' 1160 et seq.
  • Peniarth MS 22 in the National Library of Wales

Published date: 1959

Article Copyright: http://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/

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